Steroid induced rosacea recovery

Conditions of the human integumentary system constitute a broad spectrum of diseases, also known as dermatoses , as well as many nonpathologic states (like, in certain circumstances, melanonychia and racquet nails ). [15] [16] While only a small number of skin diseases account for most visits to the physician , thousands of skin conditions have been described. [14] Classification of these conditions often presents many nosological challenges, since underlying etiologies and pathogenetics are often not known. [17] [18] Therefore, most current textbooks present a classification based on location (for example, conditions of the mucous membrane ), morphology ( chronic blistering conditions ), etiology ( skin conditions resulting from physical factors ), and so on. [19] [20] Clinically, the diagnosis of any particular skin condition is made by gathering pertinent information regarding the presenting skin lesion (s), including the location (such as arms, head, legs), symptoms ( pruritus , pain), duration (acute or chronic), arrangement (solitary, generalized, annular, linear), morphology ( macules , papules , vesicles ), and color (red, blue, brown, black, white, yellow). [21] Diagnosis of many conditions often also requires a skin biopsy which yields histologic information [22] [23] that can be correlated with the clinical presentation and any laboratory data. [24] [25] [26]

Steroid-induced rosacealike dermatitis (SIRD) is an eruption composed of papules, pustules, papulovesicles, and sometimes nodules with telangiectatic vessels on a diffuse erythematous and edematous background. It results from prolonged topical steroid use or as a rebound phenomenon after discontinuation of topical steroid. There are 3 types of SIRD that are classified based on the location of the eruption: perioral, centrofacial, and diffuse. Diagnosis of this disease entity relies on a thorough patient history and physical examination. Treatment involves discontinuation of the offending topical steroid and administration of oral and/or topical antibiotics. Topical calcineurin antagonists should be considered as alternative or adjunctive therapies for patients who do not respond to traditional treatments. Dermatologists may need to provide psychological support during office visits for patients who have difficulty dealing with the discontinuation of topical steroid and/or the psychological impact of a flare. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, histopathology, and differential diagnosis of the entity also are reviewed.

Finding proper treatment can be difficult - while a dermatologist may understand the complexities of treating the facial skin of rosacea, they lack the training and expertise required to address the symptoms of rosacea involving the eyes. To address the symptoms of eye rosacea, an ophthalmologist would be recommended. Keep in mind though that while they specialize in the treatment of ocular conditions including those involving rosacea, they may not always be aware of the skin symptoms of rosacea and therefore may not link the involvement of ocular and skin in the same condition making it challenging to co-ordinate a treatment plan.

Steroid induced rosacea recovery

steroid induced rosacea recovery

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